Learning About Civil Rights

Learning About Civil Rights

Civil rights are granted by a local or national government, and are in theory extended to all citizens and sometimes other types of residents. Since those rights are confirmed in specific laws and other kinds of governing documents, the violation of those rights makes it possible to take legal action against the offending party or parties. Examples of Civil Rights In many nations, the right to free speech is considered a civil right. This is the case when the laws of the land specifically provide for this privilege in the form of an enforceable statute. Typically, there may be laws that do place some limitations on the practice of free speech. For example, libel and slander laws help protect innocent parties from being victimized by those who would spread unverifiable data about them. The right to vote is another example of a civil right. Governments set specific qualifications for being able to enjoy this right. This means that a voter may have to be at least a certain age...

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Becoming a Civil Rights Lawyer

Becoming a Civil Rights Lawyer

Lawyers have the option of developing practices that cover a number of different types of legal services and support. Many choose to specialize in certain areas of law. One of the options open to lawyers is specializing in the area of civil rights. The Basic Credentials There is no specific type of legal degree that is associated with becoming a civil rights lawyer. Rather, the law student must successfully complete the studies necessary to earn a Juris Doctor degree in law. From there, it is necessary to pass the bar exam and receive licensure. This is extremely important, since holding a degree is necessary for admittance to the exam. Without successfully completing the exam, there is no chance of being able to practice law in any jurisdiction. The Laws and Legal Precedents Possessing a keen interest in civil rights is a must for anyone who wants to effectively represent clients who feel their rights have been violated. During the pursuit of the law degree, the student will have plenty...

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Four Key Civil Rights Cases

Four Key Civil Rights Cases

In times past, legal action was necessary to bring about more specific laws that extended those rights to more people. By understanding the significance of a few of those events, it is easier to grasp why continuing to protect the rights of all people ultimately benefits everyone. Minor versus Happersett In 1875, the ruling in this case found that the Constitution did not provide grounds for extending the right to vote to women. The issue revolved around the attempt of a woman to register to vote in the state of Missouri. While the Supreme Court upheld a lower court ruling, the case helped to increase interest in the Women’s Suffrage movement, and ultimately the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920. Plessy versus Ferguson This 1896 case established the precedent that was eventually known as separate but equal facilities. The case involved a suit against the state of Louisiana and the practice of providing separate facilities for the use of African Americans, as opposed to all citizens using the...

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A Guide to Civil Rights

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